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Category: Vegetarian

Spicy Kimchi Cabbage Noodles with Silken Tofu by Foodie’s Chef Laura Brennan

 

This is a spicy vegetarian noodle dish with flavors of Korea; namely kimchi and gochujang.   (It’s time to open that jar of kimchi that’s been waiting in your fridge for some attention.)

 

Kimchi is spicy fermented cabbage, now widely available in the refrigerated and/or pickle/Asian section at your market. Or if you are very lucky, it’s a gift from a very good friend!

 Gochujang is a thick, spicy-sweet paste of red chilies, sticky rice and fermented soybeans, which is now, also available in markets.  Both these traditional Korean ingredients give the dish requisite heat and umami flavor.

 

Carrot Mash with Slow-Cooked Chard, Harissa Yogurt Swirl & Chopped Pistachios by Foodie’s Chef Laura Brennan

 

It’s a cumbersome title, I know.  It’s just a description of a dish composed of flavors, textures, spices and crunch.

 

 It was delicious on its own. And while eating it, I thought a side of grilled lamb skewers would be a great accompaniment. 

 

To this end, I’m proposing a new “Me-Too-Vegetable” movement where meat and protein dishes accompany the vegetables in a reversal of hierarchy.

 

I recommend reading through the recipe to figure out how to best maximize your time and efforts.  For example, the carrot puree could be made the day before and re-heated. Dice all the onions for the recipe at one time (1 ½ cups) and divide to use.  Or the chard, when prepped, could be cooking at the same time as the carrot puree/mash.

 

 

Buffalo Cauliflower, Cauliflower Pizza by Foodie’s Chef Laura Brennan

 

This is the first batch of buffalo cauliflower that I have ever made.  And I don’t know why, because it was so easy and delicious.  It flies out the door when it’s stocked in our deli case.  But for me, I suspect that it’s a matter of chef-esthetics; just roasted, fresh-out-of-the oven trumps pre-made, cold-in-the-case any day.  So, if you have the time, make it yourself.

 

I chose to turn my roasted buffalo cauliflower into a pizza, mainly because I was curious to try the frozen cauliflower pizza crusts, aka “cauliPower!   (This recipe makes enough for 2 cauliPower crusts.) Roasted buffalo cauliflower would also be good mixed in a baked macaroni and cheese dish or as the star ingredient in a rice and grain bowl.

 

Mixed-Media Vegetarian Udon Noodles by Foodie’s Chef Laura Brennan

 

One of my favorite online clothing retailers describes garments made with different patterns or fabric details as: ‘mixed-media’.  And I thought it was an apt description for this dish of Japanese udon noodles paired with a hybrid Middle Eastern tahini sauce.

It is a versatile dish:  make ahead or hold at room temperature to be eaten within 2-4 hours.

 

Naan Flatbread ‘Pizza’ (Vegetarian, Non-Dairy) By Foodie’s Chef Laura Brennan

 

Many years ago, a working mother (mine) would make individual mini pizzas using split English muffins as the base.  They were buttered and toasted under the broiler first to crisp-up the surface and then the usual pizza toppings were piled on top and then back into the oven to melt and ooze.  The sauce was always a bit of leftover ‘red gravy’ (marinara sauce) from the weekend’s cooking; never sauce from a jar!

 

Fast forward to 2020 and we have a plethora of pizza crusts and substitutes readily available.    In this recipe I have used the ‘slipper-shaped’ naan bread, which is a traditional Indian flatbread.  At Foodies, we sell Stonefire Naan…there are two ‘slippers’ per package at 4.4 ounces each.   The naan bread comes in plain, whole wheat and garlic varieties.

 

It’s the base for this quickly made meal, using only vegetables and NO cheese!

 

And on the table in well under an hour!

 

 

Beyond Meat ® Bolognese Sauce by Foodie’s Chef Laura Brennan

 

I was slow to ‘join the bandwagon’ of plant-based protein meat-substitutes, then a purveyor gave me samples, and I thought I should give it a try. These are not your typical ‘veggie’ burgers.  These are patties made with green pea protein and with a texture and mouth feel thought to imitate ground beef.

 

I made a couple of traditional ‘burgers’; pan-sautéed with traditional burger toppings. The texture was indeed very ‘meat-like ‘and it looked like a sautéed beef patty in the pan, but the flavor was a bit more vegetal than beefy.  

 

And then I wondered how Beyond Meat® could be used in other ways…how about a traditional Italian Bolognese meat sauce for example?  Would the tomatoes and other traditional Bolognese sauce ingredients make a satisfying sauce without the addition of pork, beef or my beloved pancetta?

 

Well, you be the judge. 

 

The following is my version of a Beyond Meat® Bolognese sauce. 

 

Without the beef.  Without the pork.  And without the pancetta.

 

And yes…… I can hear you Italian purists scoffing at me!